Walvoord History.com

The website dedicated to Walvoord/Walvoort Family History

Testing of a photo gallery plugin called Portfolio Slideshow


 

The slideshow below is using the plugin “Portfolio Slideshow”

Henry Walvoord and his sisters thumbnail
cropped-delftbluewindmill.jpg thumbnail
image0-001 thumbnail
Walvoord Family Portrait c. 1908 thumbnail
Frederic Walvoord and John Garret Walvoord c. 1876 thumbnail
Henry Walvoord and his sisters
cropped-delftbluewindmill.jpg
image0-001
Walvoord Family Portrait c. 1908
Frederic Walvoord and John Garret Walvoord c. 1876

Henry Walvoord and his sisters, (left to right) Delia Lawson, Jane Hoopman and Mary Sweemer c. 1897. This photo was taken on the occasion of their mother Anna Maria Engle (Nolten) Walvoords death.

Walvoord Family Portrait c. 1908

Frederic Walvoord and John Garret Walvoord c. 1876

Changing the Look of Walvoord History.com with WordPress Themes

Parchment Theme

The “Parchment” Theme was used for Walvoord History.com from 2009-2011.

Hello everybody.  You will hopefully be seeing some good changes on the website.  Most notably, the theme has changed from “Adventure Journal” to “Frontier.”   Before “Adventure Journal” I used the “Parchment” theme.  I loved that theme, but the developer no longer supported any updates.  “Adventure Journal” was the new choice for a couple of years.  I still love how it displays photos on the pages and posts.  Now a change has been necessary because of all the devices out there that are used, from different browsers to, tablets to smart phones.  Getting a website to look good on all of these devices requires a theme that is “responsive.”  “Frontier” is one responsive theme that seems to fit the bill.

Adventure Journal Theme

The “Adventure Journal” Theme was used on Walvoord History.com from 2011-2014

The number one goal for this site (other than finding time to work on it) is to find the right slideshow plugin to handle the wealth of photos I have to share.  I was using a plugin called “Showtime” for a while and although it didn’t do exactly like I wanted, it served okay for a while.  But it was a “Flash” plugin and wouldn’t work on many browsers including iOS (ipads, iphones, etc.).   Flash is becoming obsolete for this reason.

Frontier Theme

The “Frontier” Theme is the new look for Walvoord History.com starting in 2014. It is a “Responsive” Theme that will adjust its look based upon what device a person is using.

So I’m now testing NextGen Gallery and quite honestly it is a pain.  It may just be a learning curve on my part, but I need something easy that will give time to add new content to the site instead of sapping all my strength on “figuring it out.”   NextGen uses “jQuery” instead of “Flash,” so that is the type of plugin I am looking for.

If any of you techies out there are familiar with WordPress themes and plugins and have suggestions on a “Responsive Theme” or a “jQuery gallery plugin” please post here and I will check them out.

I know this new theme will take some getting used to both for me and you.  Check back often, because as I learn the ins and outs of this new theme and plugins I will keep tweaking and moving things around in the hopes that the site will be easier to use and full of new content.

Scott

Photo of the Week, August 20, 2012

This is William O. and Janna (Te Kolste) Walvoord’s home in Holland Nebraska around the turn of the 20th Century.  The pathway from the picket fence gate leads to the boardwalk of the Walvoord Store seen in the lower left of the photo.  The house still stands today.

This photo is courtesy of Ann Walvoord Graff.

William O. Walvoord's house in Holland, Nebraska

William O. Walvoord’s house in Holland, Nebraska near the turn of the 20th Century. This house still stands today. In the lower left hand corner of the photo you can see the boardwalk of the Walvoord General Store.

Photo of the Week, August 13, 2012

This week’s photo is also of the Walvoord General Store in Holland, Nebraska in the early 1900s.  At this date, William O. Walvoord’s son, John Christian Walvoord (1879-1964), had taken over the store, hence the name J. C. Walvoord’s Store.  This is the east entrance to the original store.  Last week’s photo showed the south entrance which was previously a competing store.  Next door to the store’s left, is the Dutch Reformed Church in Holland, Nebraska.  The picket fence to the right surrounded the home of Willam O. Walvoord.

Thanks again to Ann Walvoord Graff for providing this wonderful photo!

J.C. Walvoord's General Store, Holland Nebraska c. 1910.

J.C. Walvoord’s General Store, Holland Nebraska c. 1910. This is the east entrance to the original store. Last week’s photo showed the south entrance which was previously a competing store. Next door to the store’s left, is the Dutch Reformed Church in Holland, Nebraska. The picket fence to the right surrounded the home of William O. Walvoord.

Photo of the Week, August 6, 2012

This week’s photo is of the Walvoord General Store in Holland, Nebraska in the early 1900s.  At this date, William O. Walvoord’s son, John Christian Walvoord (1879-1964), had taken over the store, hence the name J. C. Walvoord’s Store.  This is the south entrance to the store.  The first entrance was from the east and this particular building was to a competing store started in the early 1880s by Mr. Hoak.  Mr. Hoak sold this store to Henry van Diest and Gerrit John TeSelle.  Van Diest sold his interest in the store in 1883 to John Lubbers.  In 1892 this store was sold to William O. Walvoord and he combined the stores.  In the early 1900s William  turned the enterprise over to his eldest son, John who was joined by Garret Lubbers.

Thanks to Ann Walvoord Graff for providing this wonderful photo!

J. C. Walvoord's General Store c.1910

South entrance to J. C. Walvoord’s General Store c.1910. His father, William O. Walvoord’s house can be seen in the far right of the photo (through the picket fence gate). It was next door to the East entrance.

 

Trip to the Netherlands Spring 2010

Our immigrant ancestors had to be able to adapt to changes in their lives when they came to the US.  The same is true today.  A friend, Beverly Cambre, and I had a trip planned to the Netherlands, Venice, and a Tuscany tour in the spring of 2010.  Just a few days before we were scheduled to leave the United States, ash from a volcano in Iceland shut down the airports in Europe as well as in the US.  So, we regrouped and were able to leave a week later.  We had to change the order of our trip.  First we went to Venice, then did the Tuscany tour and ended up in Amsterdam on Saturday afternoon.  We spent the next few days doing the sights in Amsterdam.

Bicycle Parking Lot at Downtown Amsterdam Train Station

Bicycle Parking Lot at Downtown Amsterdam Train Station

Thursday, we walked to the train station, and bought tickets to Lelystad.    The parking  garage connected to the train station was not for cars but for bicycles. The folks at the hotel said we could take an express train to Lelystad – about 45 minutes to the north.  Not so.  We had to change trains along the way but that was not a big deal. That day was a National Holiday. The express trains did not run on holidays.  The person selling the tickets did not know what the holiday was; just that it was a national holiday.  Our fellow passengers did not know either.

Our train route from Lelystad to Aalten

Our train route from Lelystad to Aalten

My cousin’s husband, Freek Warger, met us at the train station in Lelystad and took us to their home.  Ina teKolstee Warger and I had been corresponding since the mid 1990’s.  My great-grandmother and Ina’s great-grandfather were brother and sister.  My great-grandmother was Janna Hendrika teKolstee who married William O. Walvoord in 1874 in Holland, Nebraska.  We had morning coffee, learned that the National Holiday was Ascension Day, visited, and had lunch.

William O. Walvoord c. 1894

William O. Walvoord, Holland, Nebraska c. 1894

Janna "Jane" Hendrika (teKolstee) Walvoord, Holland, Nebraska c. 1894

Janna “Jane” Hendrika (teKolstee) Walvoord, Holland, Nebraska c. 1894

A trip of a lifetime began  after lunch.  We saw families riding bicycles and spending time in the parks.  Ina said this was the custom on Ascension Day.  It was especially nice to have Ina and Freek describe the countryside and places of interest along the way.   Our  trip across Netherlands was delightful.   Our first stop was at a park with an eating establishment.

We sat around the original fireplace drinking hot tea or hot chocolate.   It was awesome.   Ina could remember the house before it was the eating establishment.  Henk B. Walvoort and his wife Aafke, and his 1st cousin with the same name Henk J. Walvoort were there also.  Henk and Aafke live on the farm next to Ina’s sister, Dini.  The following Spring of 2011, both Henk Walvoorts visited the U.S.   It was time to move on so we said our goodbyes to the Walvoorts and continued driving on closer to the German border.

Janna Hendrika teKolstee house

This was the house, in Aalten, Gelderland, where Janna Hendrika teKolstee was born in 1851. The date on the side of the building said 1885. It was originally a house long before that and had had major renovations in 1885 and had more renovations later as it became an eating establishment.

Playground

The playground in the front of the house. The children were running around, riding their bicycles and just having fun on their holiday from school.

We stopped first in Brevevoort where some of the teKolstee ancestors were born and walked around.  Our next stop was at the home of Dini and Henk Meerdink-teKolstee, Ina’s sister and her husband.  They farm land that has been in his family since the 1600’s.  WOW.  It was a wonderful visit with new found relatives, hot drinks and homemade goodies.

On the way back to Lelystad we stopped to eat at a restaurant that Ina and Freek recommended.   It was great.  It was getting dark and most of the bicyclists had gone home.  Our first day with Ina and Freek was memorable.

We would have 2 more days with them.  It was oh so nice to have our own guides for this part of our trip.  I’ll write about the other days for a later blog.

Below are some pictures of me with my Walvoort and teKolstee cousins.

Ann Walvoord Graff, July 2012

Ann Graff and Henk J. Walvoort

Ann Graff and Henk J. Walvoort sitting around the fireplace in the teKolstee home of long ago.

Ina teKolstee-Warger and Henk B. Walvoort

Ina teKolstee-Warger and Henk B. Walvoort

Aafke Walvoort wife of Henk B. Walvoort

Aafke Walvoort wife of Henk B. Walvoort

Walvoort, Walvoord-Graff and Walvoort

Walvoort, Walvoord-Graff and Walvoort

teKolste cousins: Ina, Ann and Dina

Freek and Ina teKolstee Warger, Ann Graff, Dina and Henk teKolstee Meerdink

 

Photo of the Week, July 9, 2012

This photo comes to me from Wes Gibbons who is the son-in-law of Harriet Evelyn (Walvoord) Vollbrecht (1913-2006).  Harriet was the daughter of William “Will” Walvoord (1877-1973) and Alyda “Lydia” (Lemmenes) Walvoord (1882-1964).

This is a photo of my great-grandfather John Garrett Walvoord (1872-1932) and his older brother Frederic Walvoord (1869-1925) in about 1876 when they were about aged 4 and 7.  Frederic and John were the older brothers of Will.  All three were the sons of Henry Walvoord (1847-1909) and Henrietta (Eggerichs) Walvoord (1844-1929).

Frederic Walvoord and John Garrett Walvoord c. 1876

Frederic Walvoord and John Garrett Walvoord c. 1876

Photo of the Week, July 2, 2012

For this week’s photo I wanted something of a Fourth of July theme and this picture fits the bill.  I’ve was told recently that the Walvoord Family in Nebraska gathered every year for a big reunion every Independence Day.  I have also been told that their Walvoord counterparts in Wisconsin did the same.

This wonderful picture is of the Walvoords in Wisconsin.  These are children of Henry and Henrietta Walvoord.  The person sitting in the middle with the white hat is my great-grandfather John Garrett Walvoord .  The little boy on the back corner in the hat holding the American Flag is my grandfather Randall Henry Walvoord.

I date this photo around 1912.

Walvoord Wagon Fourth of July

Walvoord Wagon Fourth of July c. 1912

NEW Biography of “Nebraska Henry”

With special thanks to Cindy Lou (Walvoord) Lett, I have been able to post a new biography of Henry Walvoord (1851-1948) of the Nebraska branch.  There are so many Hendriks, and Henrys in our tree, I lightheartedly refer to this one as “Nebraska Henry.”   Henry is the younger brother of William O. Walvoord.  Nearly all of the information on this family comes from Cindy and all of the photos I have.  Thank you Cindy!

“Chances and Choices” Hendrik Walvoort Bio Updated

UpdateSome research that I compiled from Genlias (which is a joint product of the Regional History Centers and Archives in the Netherlands and overseas) has provided new insight to the history of Hendrik Walvoort (1802-1865). 

Once upon a time, I thought that he had only one son, Gerrit Jan Walvoord (1826-1856), but he also had a second son, Derk Antoni Walvoort (1827-1828), from his first marriage that died six months later.  He also had a third son from his second marriage Tonie Walvoort (1831-1833) that died at the age of two.  He also had a daughter from his third marriage, Theodora Maria Walvoord (c.1835-1840) that died at the age of five.

As I was adding more and more information from Genlais, it became evident how many young children died in that time-period in the Netherlands.  Many mothers also died in child birth.  I can’t imagine how difficult it must have been to endure such tragedy after tragedy.  It gives me a new found respect for my ancestor, Hendrik.  Even more so, when he pulled up all roots to emigrate to America for a chance at a new life.  But even here in this New World of promise, tragedy still followed Hendrik when his only surviving adult son, fell off the pier in Amsterdam, Wisconsin at the age of 30 and drowned.

Take a moment to re-read the newly updated biography of Hendrik Walvoort (1802-1865) and reflect on what chances and choices have affected you from your ancestor.

Photo of the Week, June 18, 2012

This week’s “Photo of the Week” is one of only two photos I have of one of the “Five Founders” as I describe them on the Homepage.  This is the Hendrik Jan Walvoord (1828-1921) Family that immigrated to Wisconsin in 1866.  The only other photo I have of a founder is of Gerrit Jan and Berendina (Prinsen) Walvoord that immigrated to Nebraska in 1870.

This week’s is lower quality than I would like because it is a photocopy of an original.  I don’t have a better copy of this photo.  If anyone is in possession of a better copy, please send me a copy.

The descendants of this family living in America, kept the “Walvoort” spelling with a “t” at the end.

Hendrik Jan Walvoort Family c.1897

Hendrik Jan Walvoort Family c.1897 (Top: L to R) Jan Derk “John” Walvoort, Gerrit Hendrik Walvoort. (Bottom: L to R) Gesina (Dulmes) Walvoort, Henry Walvoort, Bertus “Ben” Walvoort, Hendrika “Hattie” Walvoort, and Delia “Del” Walvoort

 

 

 

 

Photo of the Week, June 4, 2012

This week’s photo was sent to me by Ann (Walvoord) Graff.  She is a great-granddaughter of William O. Walvoord (1842-1916) from the Nebraska branch of the Walvoords.  This is a photo of the store that William O. Walvoord built in Holland, Nebraska.

This photo dates from about 1895.  The section of the building to the right was built first.  The section with the porch and awning was added to the south-side later.  And in a later photo this section was lengthened.

Walvoord & Co. General Store, Holland, Nebraska c. 1895

Walvoord & Co. General Store, Holland, Nebraska c. 1895. From left to right, Mr. Sapp (the school teacher in wooden shoes), Herman Schnieder (clerk), Tom Liesveld (partner to William O. Walvoord), J.C. Walvoord (son of William), and two unidentified children.

Photo of the Week, May 28, 2012

Tintype of Henry Walvoord (right) and an unknown person.

Tintype of Henry Walvoord (right) and an unknown person.

I am going to try to post a photo every Monday that I haven’t placed anywhere else on this site.  So many of these photos will be brand new to you.  I found this photo in a box of old Walvoord photos.  It was easy to overlook, because it was so tiny and… “tinny.”  It is a tintype.  It is only about one inch by two inches and was very easy to overlook.  I looked at it with my magnifying glass and recognized Henry Walvoord (1847-1909) immediately.

I scanned it so I could see more detail and lighten up the exposure.  It is really a good photo.  I date it between 1885-1900.  It is really hard to peg a date on this photo, because Henry’s appearance didn’t change too much over the years.  If I could identify the other person, I might be able to date it better.

 

Is it a family member?  Is it a business associate?  Maybe someone from the Dutch Canning Factory?  I really don’t know.

 

How about you?  Is there anyone out there that can identify the person on the left in this photo?

A Visit from Cousin Sandi Neal

Sandi Neal and Scott Walvoord

Sandi Neal and Scott Walvoord in Nashville, Tennessee May 2012

Earlier this month, I met my cousin Sandi Neal for the first time.  Sandi was born Sandra Kay Walvoord and is the daughter of  Frederick Lee Walvoord (1907-1962) and Reba Lenora (Stepp) Walvoord (1914-2003).  She is the granddaughter of Frederick Walvoord (1869-1925) and Jennie (Lammers) Walvoord (1874-1970).

Sandi was in Nashville, Tennessee for two months to stay with a family friend who needed help.

Sandi and I had corresponded for several years about Walvoord family history and I felt like I had known her a long time.

When Sandi called to set up a time to meet, for some reason, I thought I might have met her in person before and had just forgotten.

When we finally met, Sandi showed up on our doorstep I was amazed at the family resemblance.  She looks just like a — Walvoord!  My cousin Cindy Horton saw pictures on Facebook and thought she looked a lot like my dad.  Her smile reminded me of my grandfather’s smile, my great-uncle John’s smile and my cousin Mark’s smile all rolled into one.  The Walvoords have a certain trademark smile that transcends generations.  Sandi has that same wonderful SMILE!

I have admired Sandi’s work for many years.  In the late 1970s, she published a family news bulletin on the Walvoord family.

Walvoord - Walvoort Family News Bulletin

The Walvoord – Walvoort Family News Bulletin was published by Sandi Neal from the Summer 1978 until the final issue Winter of 1979

Walvoord Family would write in with news stories of their particular branch of the family.  Some articles were as simple as a wedding announcement or an obituary.  Others sent  detailed stories of trips to Europe and The Netherlands.  And of course, many pages had Family Group Sheets that are the basic building blocks of the hobby of genealogy.

The artwork for the cover was done by Shirley Garrett (daughter of Evelyn [Walvoord] Beyer).

Unbelievable to me, this newsletter, only had three issues!  I had to double check, because it seems like so much more.  It has such a treasure trove of information.  Years ago, I took my copies to Kinkos and had them copy and spiral bind it.  It is about ½ an inch thick.

Sandi and I were able to talk about her side of the family and what is was like to be the descendant of a Homesteader in Montana.

As Sandi and my family visited that first day together.  It seemed as though we had known each other all our lives.  It was really an amazing experience to grow up thousands of miles apart from each others’ families and yet have the same heritage that binds us together as a family.  My daughter just seemed to instinctively know that Sandi was family and went to give a hug as she came through our front door for the first time.

Sandi corresponded to Walvoord descendants for years and years from her remote location in the west (Montana, Wyoming and California) far removed from the Walvoord heartland in Wisconsin and Nebraska.  She has known many Walvoords through the years but when we met, she said, “Scott, you’re the first Walvoord I’ve ever met outside my immediate family.”  That really surprised me.

WalvoordHistory.com World-wide Headquarters!

Sandi and Scott discuss the website at WalvoordHistory.com World-wide Headquarters!

I was also able to briefly show Sandi the ins-and-outs of how WalvoordHistory.com works and about my idea to expand the number of authors and contributors to the site.  Sandi has graciously agreed to help write articles on the newly renamed “Walv-Blog.”

I am hoping to get a guild of Walvoord family descendants from each of the different founding groups to become regular contributors or authors writing about their unique stories of Walvoord/Walvoort  Family History.

Even if one writes an article every other month or so, think of how many wonderful posts we will have archiving these stories for future generations just like Sandi’s Newsletter did all those years ago.

 

 

 

Walvoord History.com © 2014 Frontier Theme